Archive for the 'sailing' Category

the joy of tiny sailboats

an interesting video about malay jongs – tiny little sailboats.

jongs

For centuries the Malays in South East Asia have been racing jongs, or miniature wooden sailing boats. The sport has been dying out in recent years, but volunteers are determined to keep their tradition alive.

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/embed/p06tlgdq/46423181

(I can’t the video to embed here… click the link above to see the video)

h/t: BBC article

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sailors: what I really do

this is pretty accurate:

h/t: log of spartina

points of sail

here’s a nice points of sail diagram, with a bit of humor mixed in!

ins & outs of ratchet blocks

here is another really cool video by Harken to visually demonstrate how their ratchet blocks work to reduce the load that your hands see for holding lines that are trimmed often (so your mainsheet on a Sunfish, and spinnakers or jibs & other lines on other sailboats).

they use a load cell (or load indicator) on the line going to his hand to show the load reduction that occurs with a ratchet block.  a key note: the load required to trim (or pull your sail in) is the same as without the ratchet system, but the load required to ease or hold the line is reduced (quite a bit) due to the ratchet block mechanism (a combination of the “stopped” sheave and the grooves that increase friction).

Sunfish sailors often use one of the following blocks for their mainsheet control:

I’ve traditionally used the 2135 (shown here on my mainsheet controls upgrade post), as it is usually cheaper, and the switch is usually easy enough to reach if I wanted to release the ratchet mechanism to allow the line to run freely.

Harken blocks: ratchet vs. ratchamatic

Harken has put together a nice video that explains the difference between a ratchet block and a ratchamatic block.

the main difference is that the ratchamatic blocks are load-sensing and have a “ratchet that instantly engages when a predetermined load is reached. When unloaded, the ratchet pawl seamlessly disengages to allow the sheet to run out instantly during mark roundings and jibes. The Ratchamatic allows lightly-loaded sheets to run freely in both directions for fingertip control” (source: Harken Q&A)

Sunfish sailors often use one of the following blocks for their mainsheet control:

I’ve traditionally used the 2135 (shown here on my mainsheet controls upgrade post), as it is usually cheaper, and the switch is usually easy enough to reach if I wanted to release the ratchet mechanism to allow the line to run freely. for a Sunfish sailor looking to race, the 2625 might be a better option as it will let the mainsheet out easier when your time spent changing tacks could make the difference in a race.

h/t: @harken

500,000 pageviews & a giveaway

a couple weeks ago, the my2fish: Sunfish sailing blog passed 500,000 pageviews (all-time).

ONE [HALF] MILLION PAGEVIEWS!

it took a little under 4 years to reach 200,000, then a little over 1 year to get up to 300k, a little over 1.5 years to get to 400k, and then about 2.5 years to get the next 100k and get to the half a million mark. it is interesting (to me at least!), to watch the ebb and flow of the blog visitors.  with a mostly summer sport, it definitely slows down during the winter – and then picks up quite a bit as the weather warms up – peaking in that June/July/August time when sailing is a bit more relevant to most people’s lives.

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for those who have just found the blog – thanks for visiting, and I hope you stick around a while!

for those who have been following the blog for a long time – thanks for all the views, the comments, and the feedback over these last few years! 

I’ve had a lot of fun with the blogging, and I hope it’s been an interesting journey.

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similar to the 200k giveaway and 300k giveaway and 400k giveaway, I am having another cool gear giveaway to celebrate the 500,000 pageview milestone!  for this give-away, it will be a brass Captain’s Whistle, made by Oceanus Brass.  they currently have a Kickstarter campaign to fund a production run of the Captain’s Whistles and they’ve offered to give one to the lucky winner.

if you recall, they also recently provided me with one of their bow-shackle pens, so I guarantee the craftsmanship of the Captain’s Whistle will likewise be amazing!

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so here are the giveaway details, rules, etc.

  • to enter the contest, you need to leave a comment on this blog post (you can enter your name as “anonymous”, or whatever you like really) – but I will eventually need an email to contact you if you are chosen as the winner!
  • no other specific requirement for the comment itself, but I will moderate as need be!
  • multiple comments do not equal multiple entries!
  • after 2 weeks, I will randomly select one person that has commented – and will coordinate with Oceanus Brass to get the Captain’s Whistle shipped directly from them to the winner.

thanks again for visiting the blog! and let the commenting begin!

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full disclosure: the gift item for the give-away is a sponsored item provided by Oceanus Brass.

 

sailing art: Monet – The Riverbank at Petit-Gennevilliers

I like Monet.

The Riverbank at Petit-Gennevilliers, Sunset (1875)

Oil on canvas, 61 x 80 cm


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